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Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium, Anthriscus longirostris)

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Also listed as: Anthriscus cerefolium, Anthriscus longirostris, Garden chervil
Related terms
Background
Evidencetable
Tradition
Dosing
Safety
Interactions
Attribution
Bibliography

Related Terms
  • Anthriscuslongirostris, Anthriscussylvestris, Apiaceae (former name: Umbelliferae), bioflavonoids, French parsley, garden chervil, gourmet's parsley, leaf chervil, salad chervil.
  • Note: Wild chervil (Anthriscussylvestris), also known as cow parsley, is a poisonous species and noxious weed distantly related to garden chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium) and is not included in this monograph.

Background
  • Chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium or Anthriscus longirostris) is an annual herb native to the Caucasus area, which is located at the border between Europe and Asia. Chervil, sometimes called garden chervil or salad chervil, is a member of the Apiaceae family.
  • Very popular in the 19th Century, chervil is used to season foods, such as soups, salads, sauces, eggs, cheese, and butter, and it is a commonly used in French cuisine. The young leaves of chervil smell similar to anise and are often preserved in vinegar before they lose their aroma. Chervil is typically added to foods at the end of preparation or as a garnish since cooking it may result in a loss of flavor.
  • Another type of chervil, sometimes called turnip-rooted chervil or tuberous-rooted chervil, is grown as a root vegetable. This type of chervil produces much thicker roots than the types cultivated for their leaves. Wild chervil (Anthriscus sylvestris), also known as cow parsley, is a poisonous species and noxious weed distantly related to garden chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium).
  • Historically, chervil has been used as an expectorant, aromatic, bitter tonic, digestive stimulant, and an eyewash to refresh the eyes. In secondary sources, the use of chervil has also been noted for its blood-thinning and blood-pressure-lowering properties. Chervil has also been shown to have antioxidant effects in laboratory research. Chervil is a rich source of bioflavonoids, which may aid in vitamin C absorption.
  • At this time, there is a lack of high-quality human trials supporting the effectiveness of chervil for any medical condition.
  • Chervil and chervil extract are listed in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list. According to secondary sources, chervil essential oils may not be suitable for use in skincare products, due to the presence of irritants and toxins.

Evidence Table

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. GRADE *
* Key to grades

A: Strong scientific evidence for this use
B: Good scientific evidence for this use
C: Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D: Fair scientific evidence for this use (it may not work)
F: Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likley does not work)


Tradition / Theory

The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

  • Aging, animal bites, antihypertensive, antioxidant, antiseptic, blood purifier, coughs, decreased perspiration, digestive aid, diuretic, expectorant, eyewash, flatulence, flavoring agent, hiccups, insect repellant, insecticidal, mood (elevate), pregnancy, skin toner, tonic, tuberculosis, wounds.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for chervil in adults.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • There is no proven safe or effective dose for chervil in children.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid in individuals with known allergies or sensitivity to chervil, its constituents, or to members of the Apiaceae family.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • There is a lack of information regarding the safety of chervil. However, chervil and chervil extract are listed in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list.
  • According to secondary sources, chervil may not be safe for use in skincare products, due to possible irritants and toxins in chervil essential oils.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Although there is a lack of information about the safety of consumption of chervil during pregnancy or in breastfeeding women, chervil and chervil extract are listed in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list.
  • Information on the effects of chervil during breastfeeding is lacking in the National Library of Medicine's Drugs and Lactation Database (LactMed).

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

  • Not enough scientific data available.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Chervil may have antioxidant effects.
  • Chervil may contain bioflavonoids that may help the body absorb vitamin C.

Attribution
  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

Bibliography
  1. Chaigneau, M and Muraz, B. [Decontamination of some spices by ethylene oxide. Development of 2-chloroethanol and ethylene glycol during the preservation]. Ann Pharm Fr 1993;51(1):47-53.
  2. Fejes, S, Blazovics, A, Lemberkovics, E, et al. Free radical scavenging and membrane protective effects of methanol extracts from Anthriscus cerefolium L. (Hoffm.) and Petroselinum crispum(Mill.) nym. ex A.W. Hill. Phytother.Res 2000;14(5):362-365.
  3. Fejes, S, Blazovics, A, Lugasi, A, et al. In vitro antioxidant activity of Anthriscus cerefolium L. (Hoffm.) extracts. J Ethnopharmacol 2000;69(3):259-265.
  4. Glaze, LE. Collaborative study of a method for the extraction of light filth from whole, cracked, or flaked and ground spices. J Assoc Off Anal Chem 1975;58(3):447-450.
  5. Lemberkovics, E, Kery, A, Marczal, G, et al. [Phytochemical evaluation of essential oils, medicinal plants and their preparations]. Acta Pharm Hung 1998;68(3):141-149.
  6. Pestemer, W and Mann, W. [Herbicide residues in some herbs (author's transl)]. Z Lebensm Unters Forsch 1980;171(4):272-277.
  7. Zwaving, JH, Smith, D, and Bos, R. The essential oil of chervil, Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm. Isolation of 1-allyl-2,4-dimethoxybenzene. Pharm Weekbl 3-19-1971;106(12):182-189.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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