Table of Contents > Interactions & Depletions > Acerola (Malpighia glabra, Malpighia punicifolia) Print

Acerola (Malpighia glabra, Malpighia punicifolia)



Interactions

Acerola/Drug Interactions:
  • Acidic or basic drugsAcidic or basic drugs: In theory, the vitamin C in acerola may interact with acidic or basic drugs, acidify urine and affect excretion.
  • Anticoagulant agentsAnticoagulant agents: Vitamin C may interfere with the blood thinning effects of warfarin by lowering prothrombin time (PT) according to one case report (14).
  • Estrogen/oral contraceptivesEstrogen/oral contraceptives: Concomitant use of acerola with estrogens may increase absorption and therapeutic effects due to the vitamin C content (12; 13).
  • FluphenazineFluphenazine: In theory, concomitant use of acerola with fluphenazine (Prolixin®) may decrease blood levels due to acerola vitamin C content.

Acerola/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AlfalfaAlfalfa: Acerola cherry extract may increase the antioxidant effect of alfalfa (8).
  • Anticoagulant herbs and supplementsAnticoagulant herbs and supplements: Vitamin C may interfere with the blood thinning effects of warfarin by lowering prothrombin time (14).
  • IronIron: When taken together, the vitamin C in acerola may increase the absorption of iron in the gastrointestinal tract, although this effect appears to be variable and may not be clinically significant.
  • SoySoy: Acerola cherry extract may increase the antioxidant effect of soy (8).
  • Vitamin CVitamin C: Due to acerola's high vitamin C content, taking vitamin C supplements in addition to the herb may increase the total amount of vitamin C absorbed.

Acerola/Food Interactions:
  • Soy productsSoy products: Acerola cherry extracts may increase the antioxidant effect of foods that contain soy (8).
  • Vitamin C-containing foodsVitamin C-containing foods: Due to acerola's high vitamin C content, taking acerola with other foods containing vitamin C may increase the total amount of absorbed vitamin C.

Acerola/Lab Interactions:
  • Prothrombin time (PT)Prothrombin time (PT): Vitamin C in high doses appears to interfere with the anticoagulant effects of warfarin and reduce prothrombin time (PT) as noted in one case report (14). Complications of this effect, such as blood clots, have not been reported.
  • Stool occult blood testsStool occult blood tests: The vitamin C in acerola may cause false-negative results if it is consumed 48-72 hours before amine-dependent tests.
  • Urine glucose testsUrine glucose tests: Doses of vitamin C greater than 500mg may cause false-negative results with glucose oxidase tests and false-positive results in cupric sulfate tests.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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