Table of Contents > Interactions & Depletions > White horehound (Marrubium vulgare Labiatae) Print

White horehound (Marrubium vulgare Labiatae)



Interactions

White horehound/Drug Interactions:
  • 5HT1 agonists (triptans)5HT1 agonists (triptans): Preclinical studies suggest that white horehound may antagonize the effects of serotonin (1).
  • AnalgesicsAnalgesics: In vivo models of pain in mice report significant analgesic activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of Marrubium vulgare (12). The exact mechanisms remain to be determined but appear not to involve the inhibition of opioid receptors. Based on animal study, nociceptive action is not reversed by naloxone (13).
  • AnestheticsAnesthetics: Based on secondary sources, white horehound may interfere with the action of inhaled anesthetics.
  • Antiarrhythmic agentsAntiarrhythmic agents: In animal study, large amounts of white horehound have caused arrhythmias (1).
  • Antidepressant agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)Antidepressant agents, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs): Preclinical studies suggest that white horehound may antagonize the effects of serotonin (1).
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: Based on clinical and animal study, white horehound may have blood glucose-lowering activity (7; 2; 6).
  • AntiemeticsAntiemetics: White horehound is considered to be an emetic and cathartic in large doses, due to its proposed mechanism of action on the gastrointestinal tract. Theoretically, white horehound may interact with serotonin receptor antagonists such as ondansetron, based on in vitro studies suggesting serotonin-antagonizing effects (1).
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: Based on animal study, white horehound may have hypotensive effects (3; 8).
  • Antilipemic agentsAntilipemic agents: In patients with type 2 diabetes treated with Marrubium vulgare, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lowered by 4.16% and 5.78%, respectively (6).
  • AntispasmodicsAntispasmodics: A hydroalcoholic extract of Marrubium vulgare has been shown to exhibit antispasmodic effects in animals (13).
  • Cytochrome P450 2D6 substratesCytochrome P450 2D6 substrates: Based on secondary sources, white horehound acts as a cytochrome P450 2D6 inhibitor.
  • DiureticsDiuretics: Based on secondary sources, white horehound may have aldosterone-enhancing properties, and thus may alter the effects of diuretics, particularly aldosterone-antagonist diuretics.
  • EstrogensEstrogens: Based on secondary sources, white horehound may contain phytoestrogenic compounds. Theoretically, white horehound may interfere with estrogen therapy.
  • ExpectorantsExpectorants: White horehound has proposed expectorant activity. The effect of concomitant use with other expectorants is unclear.
  • Gastrointestinal agentsGastrointestinal agents: White horehound is considered to be an emetic and cathartic in large doses and may cause diarrhea due to its proposed mechanism of action on the gastrointestinal tract. White horehound may cause intestinal dilation or ileus due to proposed aldosterone-enhancing properties.
  • Hormonal agentsHormonal agents: Due to proposed hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPA) effects of white horehound constituents, various hormonal levels may theoretically be altered, although there is limited human clinical information in this area. White horehound may contain phytoestrogenic compounds that may interfere with estrogen therapy.
  • PenicillinsPenicillins: Anecdotal reports suggest that white horehound may interact with the excretion of penicillin, although details and scientific data are limited.
  • VasodilatorsVasodilators: Based on animal study, white horehound may have vascular relaxant activity (3; 14).
  • VasopressorsVasopressors: Based on animal study, white horehound may have vascular relaxant activity (3; 14).

White horehound/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AnalgesicsAnalgesics: In vivo models of pain in mice report significant analgesic activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of Marrubium vulgare (12). The exact mechanisms remain to be determined but appear not to involve the inhibition of opioid receptors. Based on animal study, nociceptive action is not reversed by naloxone (13).
  • AnestheticsAnesthetics: Based on secondary sources, white horehound may interfere with the action of inhaled anesthetics.
  • AntiarrhythmicsAntiarrhythmics: In animal study, large amounts of white horehound have caused arrhythmias (1).
  • Antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)Antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs): Preclinical studies suggest that white horehound may antagonize the effects of serotonin (1).
  • AntiemeticsAntiemetics: White horehound is considered to be an emetic and cathartic in large doses, due to its proposed mechanism of action on the gastrointestinal tract. Theoretically, white horehound may interact with serotonin receptor antagonists such as ondansetron, based on in vitro studies that suggest potential serotonin-antagonizing effects (1).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In patients with type 2 diabetes treated with Marrubium vulgare, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lowered by 4.16% and 5.78%, respectively (6).
  • Antimigraine herbs and supplementsAntimigraine herbs and supplements: Theoretically, white horehound may interact with herbs or supplements that act as serotonin enhancers, based on in vitro studies that suggest potential serotonin-antagonizing effects (1).
  • AntispasmodicsAntispasmodics: A hydroalcoholic extract of Marrubium vulgare has been shown to exhibit antispasmodic effects in animals (13).
  • Cytochrome P450 2D6 Cytochrome P450 2D6 substrates: Based on secondary sources, white horehound acts as a cytochrome P450 2D6 inhibitor.
  • DiureticsDiuretics: Based on secondary sources, white horehound may have aldosterone-enhancing properties, and thus may alter the effects of diuretics, particularly aldosterone-antagonist diuretics.
  • ExpectorantsExpectorants: White horehound has proposed expectorant activity. The effects of concomitant use with other expectorants is unclear.
  • Gastrointestinal herbs and supplementsGastrointestinal herbs and supplements: White horehound is considered to be an emetic and cathartic in large doses and may cause diarrhea due to its proposed mechanism of action on the gastrointestinal tract. White horehound may cause intestinal dilation or ileus due to proposed aldosterone-enhancing properties.
  • Hormonal herbs and supplementsHormonal herbs and supplements: Due to proposed hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPA) effects of white horehound constituents, various hormonal levels may theoretically be altered, although there is limited human clinical information in this area. White horehound may contain phytoestrogenic compounds that may interfere with estrogen therapy.
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: Based on clinical and animal study, white horehound may have blood glucose-lowering activity (7; 2; 6).
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: Based on animal study, white horehound may have hypotensive effects (3; 8).
  • PhytoestrogensPhytoestrogens: Based on secondary sources, white horehound may contain phytoestrogenic compounds. Theoretically, white horehound may interfere with estrogen therapy.
  • Vasodilator herbs and supplementsVasodilator herbs and supplements: Based on animal study, white horehound may have vascular relaxant activity (3; 14).
  • Vasorelaxant herbs and supplementsVasorelaxant herbs and supplements: Based on animal study, white horehound may have vascular relaxant activity (3; 14).

White horehound/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

White horehound/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood glucoseBlood glucose: Based on clinical and animal study, white horehound may have blood glucose-lowering activity (7; 2; 6).
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: Based on animal study, white horehound may have hypotensive effects (3; 8).
  • EKGEKG: In animal study, large amounts of white horehound have caused arrhythmias (1).
  • Lipid profileLipid profile: In patients with type 2 diabetes treated with Marrubium vulgare, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were lowered by 4.16% and 5.78%, respectively (6).
  • Serum electrolytesSerum electrolytes: Potassium and sodium levels may theoretically be altered, due to the proposed aldosterone-enhancing activity of white horehound.
  • Serum hormone levelsSerum hormone levels: Due to proposed hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPA) effects of white horehound constituents, various hormonal levels may theoretically be altered, although there is limited human clinical information in this area. White horehound may contain phytoestrogenic compounds.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

Search Site